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2. Perceived Risks of Global Warming

Feb 15, 2023 | All Categories

Climate Change in the American Mind: Beliefs & Attitudes, December 2022


2.1. Many Americans say they have personally experienced the effects of global warming.

Many Americans (47%) agree with the statement “I have personally experienced the effects of global warming,” while 53% disagree.

2.2. About half of Americans think people in the U.S. are being harmed “right now” by global warming.

About half of Americans (49%) think people in the U.S. are being harmed by global warming “right now.”

2.3.  Many Americans think global warming will harm them, but more think others will be harmed.

A majority of Americans understand that global warming will cause harm. Americans are most likely to think plant and animal species (70%), future generations of people (68%) the world’s poor and people in developing countries (both 66%), and people in the U.S. (62%) will be harmed either “a great deal” or “a moderate amount” by global warming. Fewer think people in their community (50%), their family (48%), or they themselves (44%) will be harmed.

2.4. One in ten Americans have considered moving to avoid the impacts of global warming.

Research indicates1 that an increasing number of people in the United States may be considering moving away from areas particularly vulnerable to climate change impacts. We find that 10% of Americans have considered moving to avoid the impacts of global warming, while 82% have not, and 8% are not sure.

1 Hauer, M. E. (2017). Migration induced by sea-level rise could reshape the US population landscape. Nature Climate Change, 7(5), 321-325. doi:10.1038/nclimate3271

 


Citation

Leiserowitz, A., Maibach, E., Rosenthal, S., Kotcher, J., Carman, J., Verner, M., Lee, S., Ballew, M., Uppalapati, S., Campbell, E., Myers, T., Goldberg, M., & Marlon, J. (2023). Climate Change in the American Mind: Beliefs & Attitudes, December 2022. Yale University and George Mason University. New Haven, CT: Yale Program on Climate Change Communication.

Funding Source

The research was funded by the 11th Hour Project, the Energy Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation, the Heising-Simons Foundation, and the Grantham Foundation.